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Passing thoughts

20 May

1. Glad to see people enjoying the previous entry.

2. Had lunch with Sirdan at that wonderful place Chinese Whisper in Surry Hills. You have never had a fried banana dessert in your life until you try theirs! The ginger steamed fish and Buddha’s vegetarian delight are both, well, delights. Sirdan then went on to the hospice. We do take turns going as it is actually rather wearing. Not Lord M’s fault of course. In two weeks time Sirdan goes to South Africa for twelve days.

3. Lord Malcolm turns 50 next Thursday, or he might… There’s a reasonable chance he will. He had the party last year just in case.

4. The Rabbit has blogged. I may check this myself one day, though as a retired person I probably can’t afford it. 😉 Sirdan and I have put the most innocent possible construction on point 6 of The Rabbit’s amazing confession on Thomas’s meme of eight recently… (It was open to several.)

5. My modest coachee business is growing. At start of term I had four coachees; this coming week I will have seven or eight, rising to nine next term. I also have a three day project at The Mine testing all the Year Sevens (180 papers to mark and analyse for ESL Scales and such). They have missed that function of my former job there, apparently. I still have all the data, so I will be able to map trends over the past five years or so.

6. [later] I am now watching Richard Dawkins’s Channel 4 The God Delusion on ABC right now, and was taken by his employment of the slippery slope argument: my going to South Sydney Uniting Church (though he used a different example of course) is the beginning of the slippery slope that leads to carrying a backpack full of explosives onto a train… Well, you’d better watch me, people. I hadn’t realised. 😉 Seeing Ted Haggard, of all creatures, was quite an amazing experience. There is a lot in Dawkins I agree with, including his detestation of Ted Haggard. Aside from his now well-known hypocrisy, Haggard is totally wrong about the Bible; what he said to Dawkins about the Bible is sheer nonsense, something that would surprise few people at South Sydney. But I’m adding Dawkins’s megasite to my Faith and Philosophy links.

And the American treatment of atheists is disgraceful…

On the other hand, take the hospice. I really find an atheist version of what I have seen there hard to imagine. I certainly wouldn’t want to see it shut down because I or someone else (quite understandably) is critical of the Catholic Church; I am critical of the Catholic Church. But I have seen a woman in hijab (and no, not me getting confused about nuns) helping out there, and gay people — more than you can poke a stick at so to speak. Thus is practice so often better than theory.

Certainty, for sure, is one of the great enemies. I may even be certain about that…

I am looking forward to Andrew Denton’s God On My Side tomorrow night.

Further reading

See the top post on WordPress right now: Heliocentrism is an Atheist Doctrine. Hmm, I hope the spirit of Jonathan Swift is alive and well there. But maybe not; I have this sinking feeling that may not be the case. But could something so stupid possibly be genuine? It looks as if it should be on Landover Baptist Church though, doesn’t it? What do you think?

A Marcia P comments on the Heliocentrism post: There are some very frightening people on the Internet. My husband warns me all the time about situations like this, but I always tell him to shush. Now I think he may be right. These “helioleftists” are some dangerous, dangerous people. I’d ban them if I were in charge of this site. Ban them, and call the police on them if they tried posting again. It’s the only way to deal with people like that. Helioleftist. That is good… Marcia P is I suspect a Swiftian.

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13 responses to “Passing thoughts

  1. ninglun

    May 21, 2007 at 1:58 pm

    I take the 😉 in that comment does mean that you are not confusing mental illness with religion. One could also allude to the usual non-theistic aberrations like Pol Pot, even if his variety of Maoism had many of the hallmarks of fundamentalist religion as indeed Marxism in its various manifestations often has; nor would not suggest all atheists would embrace such policies.

    I think your second comment there, Arthur, simply reinforces the point that in practice a hospice is a place where intellectualism becomes rather irrelevant. It certainly doesn’t rebut the strength a place like Sacred Heart draws from its tradition.

     
  2. AV

    May 21, 2007 at 11:12 pm

    One could also allude to the usual non-theistic aberrations like Pol Pot, even if his variety of Maoism had many of the hallmarks of fundamentalist religion as indeed Marxism in its various manifestations often has; nor would not suggest all atheists would embrace such policies.

    Well, the point there is that Pol Pot’s regime had many of the hallmarks of fundamentalist religion because, like fundamentalist religion, it involved a suspension of critical-reflective thinking and the mindless embrace of dogma.

    It is difficult to imagine a slippery slope from skeptical, fallibilist and critical thinking to piles of skulls.

     
  3. ninglun

    May 21, 2007 at 11:23 pm

    We do seem to agree on that one, and I would say the same of religion that may not always involve “mindless embrace of dogma”. Kind of takes us back to the beginning of the thread, really.

     
 
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